It faded on the crowing of the cock

Stop it, Marcellus. I have heard, The cock, that is the trumpet to the morn, Doth with his lofty and shrill-sounding throat Awake the god of day; and, at his warning, Whether in sea or fire, in earth or air, The extravagant and erring spirit hies To his confine: Some say that ever videos naked boy in the woods that season comes Wherein our Saviour's birth is celebrated, The bird of dawning singeth all night long: And then, they say, no spirit dares stir abroad; The nights are wholesome; then no planets strike, No fairy takes, nor witch hath power to charm, So hallow'd and so gracious is the time.

But, look, the morn, in russet mantle clad, Walks o'er the dew of yon high eastward hill: Break we our watch up; and by my advice, Let us impart what we have seen to-night Unto young Hamlet; for, upon my life, This spirit, dumb to us, will speak to him.

Do you consent we shall acquaint him with it, As needful in our loves, fitting our duty? A platform before the castle. Nay, answer me: You come most carefully upon your hour.

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For this relief much thanks: Well, good night. I think I hear them. And liegemen to the Dane. O, farewell, honest soldier: Bernardo has my place. Say, what, is Horatio there? A piece of him. Welcome, Horatio: What, has this thing appear'd again to-night?

hamlet | "It faded on the crowing of the cock. Some say that… | Flickr

Horatio says 'tis but our fantasy, And will not let belief take hold of him Touching this dreaded sight, twice seen of us: Tush, tush, 'twill not appear. Sit down awhile; And let us once again assail your ears, That are so fortified against our story What we have two nights seen.

Well, sit we down, And let us hear Bernardo speak of this. Last night of all, When yond same star that's westward from the pole Had made his course to illume that part of heaven Where now it burns, Marcellus and myself, The bell then beating one, Peace, break thee off; look, where it comes again!

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In the same figure, like the king that's dead. Thou art a scholar; speak to it, Horatio. Looks it not like the king? Most like: What art thou that usurp'st this time of night, Together with that fair and warlike form In which the majesty of buried Denmark Did sometimes march?

How now, Horatio! Before my God, I might not this believe Without the sensible and true avouch Of mine own eyes.

Shakespeare's Hamlet Act 1 Scene 1 - Horatio sees the Ghost

As thou art to thyself: Thus twice before, and jump at this dead hour, With martial stalk hath he gone by our watch. Therefore I have entreated him along With us to watch the minutes of this night, That if again this apparition come, He may approve our eyes and speak to it. He is skeptical that the other watchmen have seen a ghost. Look where it comes again. M - The mood has definitely shifted.

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The apparition of the late king of Denmark is not a good sign for the country. The appearance of the ghost foreshadows the conflicts to follow in the play. What might be toward, that this sweaty haste Doth make the night joint laborer with the day? He describes that the kingdom is on high alert for no apparent reason, and that they are building up their warfare supplies.

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Q - Why would the new king of Denmark be preparing for war if everything seems peaceful? At least, the whisper goes so… Now, sir, young Fortinbras… hath in the skirts of Norway here and there Sharked up a list of lawless resolutes… But to recover of us by strong hand And terms compulsatory, those foresaid lands So by his father lost.